Readiness of Indian Consumers Towards the Adoption of Shared Mobility
Dipen Paul1, Dharmesh K. Mishra2

1Dipen Paul, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Management at the Symbiosis Institute of International Business which is a constituent of the Symbiosis International (Deemed University) Pune.
2Dr Dharmesh K Mishra, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Management at the Symbiosis Institute of International Business which is a constituent of the Symbiosis International (Deemed University) Pune.

Manuscript received on 25 August 2019. | Revised Manuscript received on 02 September 2019. | Manuscript published on 30 September 2019. | PP: 1782-1787 | Volume-8 Issue-11, September 2019. | Retrieval Number: K17660981119/2019©BEIESP | DOI: 10.35940/ijitee.K1766.0981119
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© The Authors. Blue Eyes Intelligence Engineering and Sciences Publication (BEIESP). This is an open access article under the CC-BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

Abstract: Public perceptions on shared mobility has substantially altered human mindsets in current times, gaining widespread popularity, particularly in the context of emerging economies struggling with increasing population density and shrinking infrastructure resources. The purpose of this study is to examine Indian consumers’ readiness towards the adoption of such shared mobility services in metropolitan cities. An online survey questionnaire was implemented to understand consumers’ readiness to adopt, commuting habits, perceived benefits, and challenges while consuming these services. A total of n=257 usable responses received from randomly selected consumers from 5 metro cities in India were critically analyzed for statistical significances. Findings suggest that in terms of readiness to adopt the consumers are showing a willingness to use shared mode of transport, major perceived key benefits are “cost”, “convenience” and “environmentally less polluting” while prominent challenges are “quality of service” and “customer satisfaction” when consumers engage with shared mobility services. Our study results will benefit public/private transport operators, policymakers, government agencies, and shared mobility consumers towards adoption, management, harnessing, and optimizing the potential benefits achieved through shared mobility strategies. The researchers propose an empirical exploration of consumers’ readiness to include multiple perception variables encompassing users from wider geographical contexts for gaining deeper insights into shared mobility adoption patterns as future research directions.
Keywords: Congestion, constraints/challenges, consumers, commuting, emissions, India, mobility, perception, pooling, sharing, metropolitan cities
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